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The Wild Party: Five things we learned at first rehearsal

The Wild Party: Five things we learned at first rehearsal
THE WILD PARTY: FIVE THINGS WE LEARNED AT FIRST REHEARSAL

“The audience is not going to be passive witnesses to the party,” said [Director Amanda Berg] Wilson. “They are going to be integral components of the party – and its conspirators. So we are going to encourage them to help mix the bathtub gin; to console the coke-snorting wannabe starlet; to read love letters; to be pulled into boiler rooms for intimate moments; to see things they are not supposed to see.” In the end, the audience will become, like the characters in the play, “a roomful of strangers who call themselves friends.”

John Moore for the DCPA News Center

Emily Van Fleet: Queenie

Emily Van Fleet: Queenie

2017 COLORADO FALL THEATRE PREVIEW DAY 7: THE REVOLUTIONISTS AND THE WILD PARTY

Over a 10-day period, the DCPA is offering a video countdown of 10 intriguing plays and musicals to watch this fall on theatre stages throughout Colorado as a service to the Colorado theatre community. Day 7: Boulder Ensemble Theatre Company’s The Revolutionists (directed by DCPA Director of Education Allison Watrous) and Off-Center’s The Wild Party at Stanley Marketplace. Today’s featured actors are Jada Dixon and Emily Van Fleet.

John Moore for the DCPA News Center

Amanda Berg Wilson in FEED Grind by Michael Ensminger

Amanda Berg Wilson in FEED Grind by Michael Ensminger
DIRECTOR AMANDA BERG WILSON WILL BE A BIG PRESENCE THIS FALL

Director of the upcoming Off-Center production, The Wild Party, talks about her upcoming projects including her plans for The Wild Party.

Juliet Wittman for Westword

Laurence Curry, Sheryl McCallum, Emily Van Fleet and Drew Horwitz. Photos by Adams VisCom.

The Wild Party Denver Cast
CAST LIST: LOOK WHO’S BEEN INVITED TO THE WILD PARTY

The Wild Party, which was nominated for seven Tony Awards when it appeared on Broadway in 2000, will feature Denver favorites Brett Ambler, Leonard Barrett Jr., Allison Caw, Laurence Curry, Diana Dresser, Katie Drinkard, Trent Hines, Drew Horwitz, Wayne Kennedy, Sheryl McCallum, Jenna Moll Reyes, Marco Robinson, Emily Van Fleet, Aaron Vega and Erin Willis.”

DCPA News Center

Photo by From the Hip Photo

DCPA TO CONTINUE IMMERSIVE THEATER PRODUCTIONS WITH ‘WILD PARTY’

The Wild Party will transport audience members back to the roaring ’20s as party guests of vaudeville dancer Queenie and her violently passionate lover, a vaudeville clown named Burrs. Based on the poem of the same title by Joseph Moncure March, The Wild Party follows an evening of musical revelry that turns to jealousy-filled tragedy set inside of the couple’s Manhattan apartment designed by Jason Sherwood. Sherwood also served as the scenic designer for last year’s production of Frankenstein.”
 

Lindsay Vandewart for 303 Magazine

Photo by Helen H. Richardson,
The Denver Post

DCPA OFF-CENTER INVITES YOU TO JOIN “THE WILD PARTY” AT THE STANLEY MARKETPLACE

“The musical follows a fête thrown by two vaudeville performers that descends into lascivious mayhem. Wilson’s interactive, 360-degree production will cast the audience as guests in the jazz-age party, complete with booze and a live band.”
 

Dylan Owens for The Denver Post

Amanda Berg Wilson in Sweet & Lucky.
Photo by Adams VisCom.

OFF-CENTER THROWING A ‘WILD PARTY’ AT STANLEY MARKETPLACE THIS FALL

“Much like Sweet & Lucky, The Wild Party will transport audience members to a different era where they will be immersed in the story as guests at Queenie and Burr’s party. The live band will be swinging, and we’ll find out what happens when you let down your guard and give yourself over to the party.”
 

DCPA News Center

Denver Gets Wild: A Q&A With Off-Center’s Charlie Miller About This Fall’s ‘The Wild Party’

“Most musicals don’t lend themselves to an immersive staging, but The Wild Party works because it has such a clear role that the audience can play in the story. It’s exciting to me because it’s not just a gimmick — by casting the audience as partygoers, we can put them right in the middle of the story and tell it in a more powerful and engaging way.”
 

No Proscenium